Sustainable Systems and Dashing Deer

After a couple week hiatus, the week in review is back. I must say that the past few weeks have been educational for me. First I had the opportunity to serve as a teacher ambassador at the Institute for Emerging Issues Forum Teachers and the Great Economic DebateMy plan following the forum was to be back at school for the remainder of the week, but snow-pocalypse happened and I spent the rest of the week holed up at my house. Then the next Monday and Tuesday it was Scaling STEM and a highly inspirational visit to Anson New Tech High School. In the midst of all this running around, AP Environmental kept plugging along. Actually, I must give them quite a bit of credit. Their video lectures got watched, classwork got completed, and they achieved their best test scores to date. Being able to continue instruction through long stretches of teacher absence is one of the strongest argument for the utilization of a combination of the flipped classroom and an LMS like Edmodo. Class rolls on, even if you aren't there.

Thankfully, I was able to help get a couple of things going before I took off on my educational adventures. The class had the chance to get their self-sustaining ecochambers up and running, we completed the population simulation Oh Deer!, and looked at some World Bank data about population growth. Though, rather than reading my account, why don't you take a moment to see what the students have to say. This week's edition of the week in review is brought to you by Taylor Byers, Kandy Crawford, and Jeniah Nickerson.

Taylor Begins:

This week in APES, we learned all about populations. Not only did we learn key concepts like the structure of populations and how to describe change within a population, but we also learned how to mathematically calculate several key factors involved when talking about growth and sustainability within a population. In addition to working on our ongoing sustainable ecosystem projects, we also started a lab in which we measure the loss of matter in a closed system growing caterpillars. On the topic of populations, we learned about some of the interactions between species. Parasitism, mutualism, commensalism and others of the like all help drive resource distribution and shapes the characteristics of a population. We also discussed the types of succession: ecological, which is divided into primary and secondary, and aquatic. Succession affects how species return to an area after a disturbance. Overall, this week was all about understanding the in’s and out’s of populations and species.

Kandy Adds:

chamberThis week in AP environmental science we officially took off on our quarterly project. Building and setting up our eco-chambers wasn’t the only fun part about this project. Each day we perform multiply test regarding our ecosystem. We check the waters oxygen, carbon dioxide, phosphate and nitrogen level and record our findings. Many of us asked, “What’s the point of this project”? As a class we said that the reason we are doing this project is because we want to see how our fish and other living things can survive in certain conditions.  Also we want to see how nutrients play a role in the whole thing.  I think everyone in the class is enjoying our first project and

Jeniah Concludes:

This week in AP environmental science we officially took off on our quarterly project. Building and setting up our eco-chambers wasn’t the only fun part about this project. Each day we perform multiply test regarding our ecosystem. We check the waters oxygen, carbon dioxide, phosphate and nitrogen level and record our findings. Many of us asked, “What’s the point of this project”? As a class we said that the reason we are doing this project is because we want to see how our fish and other living things can survive in certain conditions.  Also we want to see how nutrients play a role in the whole thing.  I think everyone in the class is enjoying our first project and

I'd be curious to know what you've been up to in your classes or if you've been to any good conferences recently. If something has recently inspired you, tell us about it.

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