The Breakdown

Slowly but surely Earth and Environmental Science is gathering steam. As such, our library of student authored posts will begin to grow. This week's installment (for the week of 1/23) was put together by Jarrett Tharington and Crystal Parks.

Jarrett Writes:

This week we learned about weathering, erosion, and the different types of soil and soil profiles. Weathering is the breaking down of rocks into sediments. There are two types of weathering, mechanical and chemical weathering. Mechanical weathering is when rock is broken down by force and pressure. Chemical weathering is the breaking down of rock chemically, for example by acid rain. Erosion is the transportation of rock sediments, this can be carried out by water, wind, or by glaciers, and humans and animals can move the sediments around. We also learned the different types of soil and the soil profiles. The soil profile consists of horizons A, B and C. Horizon A is the one with the most organic material, horizon B is the second layer it contains organic material but not as much as horizon A. Horizon C is the third and final layer, it is made up of rock and no organic materials. This is what we learned in class this week; I enjoyed class time Monday through Friday. Plus I learned a great amount of information on different subjects.

Crystal Adds:

Throughout this week we went over the topics of weathering, erosion, how soil forms, and relationships between organic and inorganic components of soil. When we went over erosion and weathering it was interesting to see the changes that rocks and soil can go through. When I walk outside and see a rock I don't have any thoughts about it but after this class it gave me more insight on what happens around my environment everyday.

When we learned about the types of soil there is I found out the best kind of soil to grow things in which is helpful because my family as well as other people in Durham have gardens.

One thing that was very interesting was learning about how the waves can crash against the side of a hill and break it away. Think about if you build a house on that! That would be horrible.

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